Poll: Is Racism Worse Post Obama?

We’ve all seen the crazy headlines where some White person has gone bananas on some random Black person and President Obama’s threat rate is up to 400%. Sure, it’s great that we live in a world where a Black man is finally running thangs, but are we better off for it?




 

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36 Replies to “Poll: Is Racism Worse Post Obama?”

  1. I’ve thought a lot about this. I think racism, for the most part, was pretty much hidden among some of my white friends. Not that it didn’t exist, but it wasn’t talked about much. Even before our President was elected, they felt compelled to send me every racist email that was circulating. I was so appalled that I began to reply to everyone on their list with my anger. I continued to do so until they finally got the message that I was not part of their ‘white racist club’.

    I believe it’s really important to speak up loudly to make your feelings known, especially when you know you are right. I once thought that when my generation finally passed, that racism might finally be dead. I now believe that it’s going to take many generations. The racism that exists in certain areas of our country and in parts of our government may never be erased. Beauty is only skin deep, but stupidity goes all the way to the bone.

  2. I’ve thought a lot about this. I think racism, for the most part, was pretty much hidden among some of my white friends. Not that it didn’t exist, but it wasn’t talked about much. Even before our President was elected, they felt compelled to send me every racist email that was circulating. I was so appalled that I began to reply to everyone on their list with my anger. I continued to do so until they finally got the message that I was not part of their ‘white racist club’.

    I believe it’s really important to speak up loudly to make your feelings known, especially when you know you are right. I once thought that when my generation finally passed, that racism might finally be dead. I now believe that it’s going to take many generations. The racism that exists in certain areas of our country and in parts of our government may never be erased. Beauty is only skin deep, but stupidity goes all the way to the bone.

  3. I’ve noticed more vocal racist comments from black to white and white to black which I hope is not part of the “Change”. I don’t think people suddenly become racist because of a presidential change. Racism is learned over a long period of time by all races and people. Good thing for future generations. It dies a little with each generation that passes.

  4. I’ve noticed more vocal racist comments from black to white and white to black which I hope is not part of the “Change”. I don’t think people suddenly become racist because of a presidential change. Racism is learned over a long period of time by all races and people. Good thing for future generations. It dies a little with each generation that passes.

  5. Yea, I know that a presidential change does not make one racist alone, but the fact that he’s a Black man running the “free” world has pissed many white people off and they’re showing their true colors. I already know it exists. I just wonder if people think it is worse now than it was before he got in office.

  6. Yea, I know that a presidential change does not make one racist alone, but the fact that he’s a Black man running the “free” world has pissed many white people off and they’re showing their true colors. I already know it exists. I just wonder if people think it is worse now than it was before he got in office.

  7. I don’t think it got worse, just more vocal. I’ve noticed racist comments from both blacks and whites more now since the election. People of all races are showing their true colors a little more I think. The bonus there is, maybe now they’ll talk about it a bit more. It’s been a taboo subject, and issues can’t be resolved until they are really adressed.

  8. I don’t think it got worse, just more vocal. I’ve noticed racist comments from both blacks and whites more now since the election. People of all races are showing their true colors a little more I think. The bonus there is, maybe now they’ll talk about it a bit more. It’s been a taboo subject, and issues can’t be resolved until they are really adressed.

  9. You know what is really funny. It was the white guys in the electoral college that voted him in, because we all know our votes don’t literally count, hence Bush’s last term in office. So the folks that are pissed can yell at themselves for who they delegated to be their voice to begin with.

  10. You know what is really funny. It was the white guys in the electoral college that voted him in, because we all know our votes don’t literally count, hence Bush’s last term in office. So the folks that are pissed can yell at themselves for who they delegated to be their voice to begin with.

  11. The vast majority of people I know and work with are not racists. I haven’t heard anything more than I ever heard before Obama got elected. As for the racial jokes – I’ve sent those, jokes about blacks, Irishmen, Catholics, men, women, midgets, whatever. They’re jokes. Barbara, perhaps if you take these seriously, then it is you that are too uptight about it all and have the issues. I think it’s sad when you can’t joke about stuff.
    I don’t give a hoot about a black man running the free world. I give a hoot about OBAMA running the free world. You see the difference there, I hope.
    And S, if you actually know anything about the electorial college, you know that not one individual’s vote actually counts, white, black or purple. Only the majority vote in that state counts. That’s either some ignorance on your part about how voting works, or perhaps some racial issues buried in you that you’re seeing stuff where it doesn’t exist.
    Hardly anyone I know (friends, co-workers, etc) even bring up the fact the Obama is black. In fact, we were well into primaries before it ever occured to me that if (when) a Democrat got in, we’d have either our first black or first woman president. I seriously just didn’t think about it. In the end, it doesn’t matter.

  12. The vast majority of people I know and work with are not racists. I haven’t heard anything more than I ever heard before Obama got elected. As for the racial jokes – I’ve sent those, jokes about blacks, Irishmen, Catholics, men, women, midgets, whatever. They’re jokes. Barbara, perhaps if you take these seriously, then it is you that are too uptight about it all and have the issues. I think it’s sad when you can’t joke about stuff.
    I don’t give a hoot about a black man running the free world. I give a hoot about OBAMA running the free world. You see the difference there, I hope.
    And S, if you actually know anything about the electorial college, you know that not one individual’s vote actually counts, white, black or purple. Only the majority vote in that state counts. That’s either some ignorance on your part about how voting works, or perhaps some racial issues buried in you that you’re seeing stuff where it doesn’t exist.
    Hardly anyone I know (friends, co-workers, etc) even bring up the fact the Obama is black. In fact, we were well into primaries before it ever occured to me that if (when) a Democrat got in, we’d have either our first black or first woman president. I seriously just didn’t think about it. In the end, it doesn’t matter.

  13. I’ve also noticed what seems to be more racial comments since the election but it might just be because I’m noticing it more now than I was before. I think that politics has revealed thoughts amongst society that may not have been revealed otherwise and because some of it does deal with our current president it’s being seen.

    Also as a side note anyone notice how Obama is sometimes referred to as “the black president” rather than “the president who happens to be black”. Someone asked me why that is once and I don’t know how closely it relates to this post but it stuck with me. The answer to his question could be as simple as the number of words being too many in the second one but I still thought I’d share.

  14. I’ve also noticed what seems to be more racial comments since the election but it might just be because I’m noticing it more now than I was before. I think that politics has revealed thoughts amongst society that may not have been revealed otherwise and because some of it does deal with our current president it’s being seen.

    Also as a side note anyone notice how Obama is sometimes referred to as “the black president” rather than “the president who happens to be black”. Someone asked me why that is once and I don’t know how closely it relates to this post but it stuck with me. The answer to his question could be as simple as the number of words being too many in the second one but I still thought I’d share.

  15. i don’t think that racism is worse post-obama. i think it is in the open again, because all the people who were trying not to seem racist understand that their power (the institution, if you will) took a real blow with the election of a black man. i’m not sure racism is the right term–the racism that our prev. gens experienced had with it laws and institutions that reiterated and enforced their hatred on every level of black ppls’ lives. now, all they have is talk and a disproportionate amount of black males in prison (but we workin on that). people are more open with their prejudices now, but i’m not sure it’s comparable to the racism of the past…

  16. i don’t think that racism is worse post-obama. i think it is in the open again, because all the people who were trying not to seem racist understand that their power (the institution, if you will) took a real blow with the election of a black man. i’m not sure racism is the right term–the racism that our prev. gens experienced had with it laws and institutions that reiterated and enforced their hatred on every level of black ppls’ lives. now, all they have is talk and a disproportionate amount of black males in prison (but we workin on that). people are more open with their prejudices now, but i’m not sure it’s comparable to the racism of the past…

  17. Although people still are in denial about it, institutional racism in this country has been COMPLETELY dead for years, outside of the white supremacist movement. Unfortunately, so is civility. What we are seeing as nation is not an increase in racism, but a decrease in taste and courtesy in general. There is a general rash of loud bigoted statements, a lack of genteel conversation skills and crudeness across the spectrum are not limited by color, gender, race, faith or sexual orientation.

  18. Although people still are in denial about it, institutional racism in this country has been COMPLETELY dead for years, outside of the white supremacist movement. Unfortunately, so is civility. What we are seeing as nation is not an increase in racism, but a decrease in taste and courtesy in general. There is a general rash of loud bigoted statements, a lack of genteel conversation skills and crudeness across the spectrum are not limited by color, gender, race, faith or sexual orientation.

  19. I believe people are just as racist as before, but Obama’s presence is bringing things to the surface. Some people assume blacks now feel more empowered and are devising plans to exact some kind of sociopolitical vengeance for past ills. Whenever you threaten the old order of things, the truth comes out.

  20. I believe people are just as racist as before, but Obama’s presence is bringing things to the surface. Some people assume blacks now feel more empowered and are devising plans to exact some kind of sociopolitical vengeance for past ills. Whenever you threaten the old order of things, the truth comes out.

  21. I respect that view, and I don’t deny that there is racism. It would be foolish to think that. I do think that bigotry in general in every which way is on the rise. However, I think institutional discrimination isn’t even about color, creed, gender, sexual preference, or identity in general, anymore.

    The real villain in my mind are socioeconomic class, societal militarization and so-called “corporate personhood”. If you have money and you can pay off governments/law enforcement, it doesn’t matter who or what you are. If you are unable to use your economic power (and unfortunately many non-whites fall under this category,) you are pretty much screwed. Perhaps this is institutional racism, but frankly, I see this more as class warfare using race or, any other factors of identity as a scapegoat.

    Frankly, if someone like Colin Powell, who is politically connected, has military credentials and money, became President, I don’t think there would be a lot of the issues that President Obama is facing. Not even Powell’s Jamaican parents would cause the furor that the xenophobic birthers bring up with the President. People view Powell as a war hero, while they view President Obama as an affirmative action case, in spite of the fact that both of them received help from affirmative action during their university careers. Is this fair? Absolutely not. Is it logical. Again, no? Is it a racial issue, perhaps. Is it about the fact that President Obama came out of nowhere, while Powell is part of the Military elite? I do think so.

    If you will notice, many of the criticisms leveled against him are based upon his having been “community organizer,” “elitist” or so-called “Liberation Theology.” We live in a very ugly society that beats upon those who feel like they are oppressed. It also has a very large distaste for people who voluntarily stop playing the “success game.” Philantrophic actions and education in general also make people in non-political classes very suspicious. This is why an idiot like Bush Jr. could get into power and be relatively popular in spite of his incompetence. Regular folks can relate to the dumb jock. They can’t deal with the idealistic altruist.

    Yes, I do hear the nasty criticism about Obama’s race and alleged background, but that’s a minority of people — and they are generally recognized as lunatics by the majority. I heard similar things about Bush’s Southern “hick” background. The difference is that the current President is not old money, like Bush, or military like Powell.

    When as a society we begin to deal with the roots of all the -isms, rather than the symptoms which are the -isms themselves, things are only going to get worse. We as a nation need to reject mass consumerism and cheap good that are made at the expense of someone else’s welfare. The Blacks (cotton) and Irish (textiles) would’ve never slaves, if people refused to purchase textile goods on humanitarian grounds, rather than using value as a sole criteria. The Chinese would’ve never been slaves until WWII if people had demanded that the railroads be built by people who were paid fair wages. Mexicans wouldn’t be risking their lives to work as serfs in this country, if people thought about their food. If we don’t deal with corporatism and the evils of “free trade,” people will continue to be exploited, no who they are. Exploiters always need to exploit to get things done. Until that gets done, there will always be scapegoats for the reason d’ jour.

    I hope this clarifies where I am coming from, and that I am not trying to be inflammatory.

  22. I respect that view, and I don’t deny that there is racism. It would be foolish to think that. I do think that bigotry in general in every which way is on the rise. However, I think institutional discrimination isn’t even about color, creed, gender, sexual preference, or identity in general, anymore.

    The real villain in my mind are socioeconomic class, societal militarization and so-called “corporate personhood”. If you have money and you can pay off governments/law enforcement, it doesn’t matter who or what you are. If you are unable to use your economic power (and unfortunately many non-whites fall under this category,) you are pretty much screwed. Perhaps this is institutional racism, but frankly, I see this more as class warfare using race or, any other factors of identity as a scapegoat.

    Frankly, if someone like Colin Powell, who is politically connected, has military credentials and money, became President, I don’t think there would be a lot of the issues that President Obama is facing. Not even Powell’s Jamaican parents would cause the furor that the xenophobic birthers bring up with the President. People view Powell as a war hero, while they view President Obama as an affirmative action case, in spite of the fact that both of them received help from affirmative action during their university careers. Is this fair? Absolutely not. Is it logical. Again, no? Is it a racial issue, perhaps. Is it about the fact that President Obama came out of nowhere, while Powell is part of the Military elite? I do think so.

    If you will notice, many of the criticisms leveled against him are based upon his having been “community organizer,” “elitist” or so-called “Liberation Theology.” We live in a very ugly society that beats upon those who feel like they are oppressed. It also has a very large distaste for people who voluntarily stop playing the “success game.” Philantrophic actions and education in general also make people in non-political classes very suspicious. This is why an idiot like Bush Jr. could get into power and be relatively popular in spite of his incompetence. Regular folks can relate to the dumb jock. They can’t deal with the idealistic altruist.

    Yes, I do hear the nasty criticism about Obama’s race and alleged background, but that’s a minority of people — and they are generally recognized as lunatics by the majority. I heard similar things about Bush’s Southern “hick” background. The difference is that the current President is not old money, like Bush, or military like Powell.

    When as a society we begin to deal with the roots of all the -isms, rather than the symptoms which are the -isms themselves, things are only going to get worse. We as a nation need to reject mass consumerism and cheap good that are made at the expense of someone else’s welfare. The Blacks (cotton) and Irish (textiles) would’ve never slaves, if people refused to purchase textile goods on humanitarian grounds, rather than using value as a sole criteria. The Chinese would’ve never been slaves until WWII if people had demanded that the railroads be built by people who were paid fair wages. Mexicans wouldn’t be risking their lives to work as serfs in this country, if people thought about their food. If we don’t deal with corporatism and the evils of “free trade,” people will continue to be exploited, no who they are. Exploiters always need to exploit to get things done. Until that gets done, there will always be scapegoats for the reason d’ jour.

    I hope this clarifies where I am coming from, and that I am not trying to be inflammatory.

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