Collette McLafferty coverband outfit

#WriterWednesday: A Great Piece On Ageism In The Music Industry

I recently featured Collette McLafferty on Ms. Nix in the Mix regarding the discrimination that women face in the music industry and a frivolous and very public court case that she found herself attached to because some misogynistic male didn’t think she was pretty enough to front a P!nk tribute band.

Read Collette’s blog below to learn more about her and this ridiculous case.

grammy-award

The Process of Winning a Grammy Award

The process of winning a Grammy award starts with a submission and goes through a process of screening, nominating, voting and more.

  • Members of the recording academy and other companies submit recordings, music videos and other music related videos and things according to what is and is not eligible. Eligibility is based on what year is considered worthy of recognition during the awards.
  • After the recording companies have submitted everything, there is a screening process. The screening involves a review process in which more than 100 experts go through to make sure the submitted videos and recordings meet the qualifications. Different qualifications are placed on each field or genre; for example, the requirements for jazz are different from the requirements for Gospel and the same goes for Rap and Classical. The screening process is not a judgment screening it is only a screening for eligibility and a screening to place the recordings in the correct genres.
  • After the screening process comes the real judgment, or the nomination process. The first ballot round is sent to voters. Voters are only allowed to vote in their genre of expertise. The voters can vote in about 20 categories in their genre or field then they may also vote for 4 categories of the General Field. The votes are then counted by an independent accounting firm. For specialized categories there are special nominating committees who determine the nominations by national nomination of voting members.
  • After the first round of voting is done there is a final voting in which the ballots are sent to voting members and the finalists are chosen. During this round Recording Academy members may vote as well. The votes are then, again, counted by an independent accounting firm.
  • The results of all the votes are then shared at the GRAMMY Awards ceremony. The results are actually sent in sealed envelopes from the independent accounting firm and they are not opened and revealed until the announcers are on stage at the GRAMMY Awards. The ceremony is shown by telecast.

The awards are given by the National Academy of Recording Arts and Sciences. The GRAMMY award is a true honor because the winners are based on votes by people in the industry, not on record sales.

It is quite a process to be nominated, voted for and to win a GRAMMY Award and that is because Grammy awards are the most highly esteemed awards that are given in the recording industry. 

Author Byline: Nicholas Wells represents GRAMMY award-winning musical groups and helps people to learn about trademark fees.

lenny-hines-black-white

Black Music Month Spotlight: Lenny Hines

Name:

Lenny Hines

Why is celebrating Black music important to you?

I think black music has a lot to give to society. It’s origins were a way of communication at one point, and to this day we still use music to express ourselves universally. My music is about reality, everyday life, relationships and having fun something universal that we all need.

What do you think of the current state of the music industry?

I think the industry from a consumer point of view is good. For an artist and someone creative it’s easier now to be seen and heard, but it’s still not easy to sell music. Consumers now have the power more than ever through online means to grab hold of their favorite songs and they don’t have to step out their door. It’s harder to track sales and plays of your songs so artists need to plug-in to artist industry organizations and get help to get things done. So there’s more opportunity out there for those who want it, but it’s still a business and it helps to know how it works.

What is your favorite song currently?

My favorite would be “Lean On Me” by Bill Withers and “Three Little Birds” by Bob Marley.

What do you love almost as much as music?

Life. I love life.

Who influences you most?

Bog Marley, Lionel Richie, Ray Charles and my Son.

A world without music is…?

Empty.

Website:

  • Black Music Month Spotlight: Tyrand (dangerouslee.biz)
  • Black Music Month Spotlight: Traz Messiah (dangerouslee.biz)
Billy Hyatt

Black Music Month Spotlight: Billy Hyatt

Name: 

Billy Hyatt

Why is celebrating Black music important to you?

Because Black Ppople have and continue to make such great contributions to music worldwide. Without the creative input that different Black culture’s brought to the game, music would be missing a lot of the flavor and ideas it now has.

What do you think of the current state of the music industry?

There are a lot of great artists backed by rich record companies that have the money to get their artists played in heavy rotation. But there are a lot of talented independent artists that should be heard. It would be cool to have sponsored radio stations that allow people to discover music from unsigned and independent artists and bands on the radio, not just the internet.

What is your favorite song currently?

Another Round by fat Joe & Chris Brown.

What do you love almost as much as music?

Peace, Love & Happiness

Who influences you most?

Everybody that works hard to achieve their goals and perfect their talents. It doesn’t matter what they do, just the fact of being dedicated to success and following through.

A world without music is…?

So very sad.

Website:

  • http://billyhyatt.com
forcemds2

Black Music Month Spotlight: Force MDs

Why is celebrating Black music important to you?
 
Because it gives an  emotional journey that gave us the soul from great creators or artists  of color who open and knock down doors for us. We are so grateful!
 
What do you think of the current state of the music industry?
 
It’s good for  those who can adapt and make technology their friend and challenging for those who are stuck in the past. Out with the old in with the  new…Jazz, Blues, Rock n Roll, Rhythm & Blues, Disco and  Hip,Hop.
 
What is your favorite song currently?
 
“Love on top” by Beyonce.
 
What do you love almost as much as music?
 
Making it and giving back to people.
 
Who influences you most?
 
The Jackson Five, Temptations, Stevie Wonder, Sam Cook, and the O’Jays.
 
A world without music is…?
 
“NO MUSIC NO LIFE”.
 
Social Media:

 

  • Black Music Month Spotlight: Jade Simmons (dangerouslee.biz)
  • Black Music Month Spotlight: Tyrand (dangerouslee.biz)
  • Black Music Month Spotlight: Traz Messiah (dangerouslee.biz)
Street 1

Black Music Month Spotlight: Black Alley

Names:

Soul Garage Band, Black Alley (members: Kacey- Lead Singer; Animal – Drummer; Josh – Bass; Eric – Lead Guitar; Hope – Keys; Mack – Keys; Beedy – Percussion)

Why is celebrating Black music important to you?

(Kacey) Celebrating black music is important because it allows for a period of reflection.  Seeing the changes and the growth of music is phenomenal.  Black music is so diverse and yet so relatable. The expression and emotion of black music is so powerful.

(Beedy) Black music is beautiful, so cool and so inspiring to me.  Black Music made me the musician I am today.

What do you think of the current state of the music industry?

(Kacey) I think that artists who have a true love and passion for their craft have a certain transparency about them.  There is some music that has infiltrated the industry that will soon be forgotten.  But true music and the love for the art will live forever.  There are so many talented musicians and artists around the world, I think soon, they will put on Main Street again.

What is your favorite song currently?

(Eric) Wiz Khalifa – The Code

What do you love almost as much as music?

(Josh) The only thing I can say I love as much as music is being a father! My baby girl Janaya Mone’ is my world! She changed my life for the better and she’s helping me to understand what a father truly is.

Who influences you most?

(Hope) Musically I’m influenced the most by Herbie Hancock and Peterson.

A world without music is…?

(Eric) George Orwell’s 1984

(Mack) A world with out music would be less creative; everything would be serious and dry.  Without music there wouldn’t be any dancing, instruments, or even singing. With out music we lose everything that is associated it. Bottom line,  the world would be a boring place.

Websites and social media links:

[youtube.com=http://youtu.be/p7RxEtX1VJE]

  • Black Music Month Spotlight: Traz Messiah (dangerouslee.biz)

Black Music Month Spotlight: L.A. Jackson

Name:

L.A. Jackson

Why is celebrating Black music important to you?

Because Black music is the foundation for all music.  So much has spun off from this music that it’s important to remember  where the heartbeat of it all came from. Credit is given to all music  styles, but then again, every style on the planet has been affected by Black music, in one way or another. I explain my perceptions in the  upcoming Music book series, Musicology 2101.

What do you think of the current state of the music industry?

It stinks. The music has to go back to the  musicians, plain and simple. For example, the artists I am working with  ALWAYS have a LIVE element to them – http://www.reverbnation.com/label/peachcityrecordsllc

What is your favorite song currently?

Africa Must Wake Up, Damian Marley and Nas.

What do you love almost as much as music?

The random thoughts that come into my mind. They helped me write  my book Musicology 2101, and help me come up with musical ideas when I’m working with artists.

Who influences you most?

God, the Marley family and my fifth grade teacher, Bernard Percy.

A world without music is…?

Fire and brimstone. Unthinkable.

Website and contact info:

  • Black Music Month Spotlight: Traz Messiah (dangerouslee.biz)

Black Music Month Spotlight: Jade Simmons

Name:

Jade Simmons

Why is celebrating Black music important to you?

Celebrating Black music is important because it’s crucial to reflect on the influence of African and African-American culture on almost all forms of music. From African drumming, to jazz to soul music we hear the traces of those sources in almost every piece of music on or off the radio.

What do you think of the current state of the music industry?

What I long to see is more diverse artistry in the mainstream. I’m waiting for more artists to be willing to create really original sounding music and not just replicate whatever is “hot” and trendy. I don’t think I could stand to hear one more song with autotune! Because of the prevalence of music competition shows and reality tv, I think audiences are ready now to take a closer look into the process of making art and the journey of interesting artists. People would be amazed by how different and how similar a Classical musician’s “road to the top” is compared to a Pop artist.

What is your favorite song currently?

Actually, my favorite song is one I just created called “Fire”! Even though I make a large part of my career playing standard and Contemporary Classical music, I’ve been branching out with music I call Hybrid Hip Hop. It incorporates beats produced for me by my partner-in-crime ,Roburt Reynolds, with me on keyboards and piano. In a recent quickie recording session in New Orleans, we came up with a Bossanova track, a Dancehall track, and Fire is a bass-heavy thumper. I’m actually going to rap over “Fire” so it’s been stuck in my head non-stop. I’m so excited to release an EP in the Fall with all these new tracks on my brand new label I’m launching called Superwoman Records.

What do you love almost as much as music?

Almost as much as music, I love speaking (and tweeting) inspirationally to audiences and to anyone who asks for advice. I have an online platform called Emerge Already! that provides career-building assistance to emerging artists. Basically, all the stuff I wished they’d taught me in school, that I had to figure out the hard way, I bottle that knowledge up and pass it along. As a Christian, I believe very strongly in the concept of being created with a divine purpose, so helping people not only discover their passions but also learn how to create a career and lifestyle around that passion so that they can greatly impact others gives me great fulfillment.

Who influences you most?

I don’t have one influence but I’m constantly looking for people to learn from. One figure that continually draws my attention is the historical King David in the Old Testament. Not just because he has this great rags to riches, warrior king story but because he was so painfully human. He had lots of successes but had tons of setbacks and made more than a few bad decisions, some that haunted him and his family for generations. Some things he was saved from, other things he had to suffer though and that’s real life. When you’re an artist with big dreams it’s painful to have any of them dashed. So it’s nice to have a model for how to move forward, how to actually surrender your grand plans to something that might actually be greater and ultimately better for you.

A world without music is…?

…a world without dancing and that’s a shame!

Website and social media links:

Black Music Month Spotlight: Patricia Wilder

Name:

Patricia Wilder

Why is celebrating Black music important to you?

I am a black woman  who expresses herself thru music. It’s a common way of communicating.

What do you think of the current state of the music industry?

The music industry is large and wide, however breaking in to sound tech engineers, to education, creation of music, the industry has moved  in a different direction and fast. It to me is more informative yet shows not much in the black realm of blues and it has moved in a different direction. Rap music has an old Motown groove pasted to the tracks. The creative part has lessened.

What is your favorite song currently?

An old gospel : I Know It Was The Blood

What do you love almost as much as music?

 Ice cream!

Who influences you most?

My mother, many musicians: Taj Mahal, Mahalia Jackson, Hezikiah Walker, Etta James, Tina Turner…

A world without music is…?

A world without communication.

Website: 

Black Music Month Spotlight: Tyrand

Name:

Tyrand

Why is celebrating Black music important to you?

It has so much soul.  No matter what type of music it is; jazz, R&B, or gospel they all have stories to tell. This is music I’ve listened to since I was born.  

What do you think of the current state of the music industry?

The music industry has changed a lot. It’s more digital now which isn’t a bad thing.  For artists, it’s actually easier.  Now you can reach fans through online media.  It’s also easier to be more independent.

What is your favorite song currently?

Right now my favorite song is Adele “One and Only”.  I really like that song.

What do you love almost as much as music?

I love film production.  A lot of people don’t know that I actually directed and edited a few of my own music videos, which I also do for other artists as well.

Who influences you most?

Most of my influences come from older artists. Teddy Pendergrass was a big influence. He was one of the first artists that I remember listening to as a child.

A world without music is…?

That’s hard to even imagine lol! But it would be a world without a lot of emotion. I think music brings emotion, like when you wake up in the morning you can listen to a certain song and it can change your mood for that whole day.

Website and social media links:

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