andy warhol

#ArtsyTuesday: 4 Useful Tips For Artists Starting Out

By Joanne Perkins

1. Be persistent

Building up a successful career takes a lot of time. You’re not going to become a successful artist overnight. Persistence is key. If you aren’t prepared to invest a lot of time into becoming a successful artist, it isn’t going to happen for you. It will more than likely take you a long time to get where you want to be and you will encounter bumps in the road along the way. It’s important to remain persistent even when something doesn’t happen or something turns out different to what you thought it would be. You have to be prepared for every eventuality and you have to let yourself get past any stumbling blocks.

2. Build up connections

It’s essential that you build up a network of connections if you want to become a successful artist. Build up an email list and notify your contacts whenever you have something to advertise, such as an exhibition or the fact that your work’s being featured in a magazine. Get your friends and family involved as well. Whenever someone supports you in any way by attending an exhibition or by buying one of your pieces, for example, maintain your connection with them by thanking them for supporting you. An excellent way of building up connections is to get yourself on as many social media sites as you can.

3. Put yourself out there

There’s a lot that can be gained from putting yourself out there. Do everything you can to learn about art and what it takes to become a professional artist. Take advantage of any opportunities that you think will be of help to you and your career, even if they don’t seem like much at the time. It’s going to take a while for you to get a sell-out exhibition at a top gallery. Until you can do that, make do with simply getting your work shown at smaller exhibitions. Start small and work your way up. Another good idea is to become involved with your local art scene. Attend events and get to know other artists in your area. Doing this is a really useful way of finding and establishing important connections.

4. Have a clear vision and realistic goals

It’s important to have an idea about what you want to do in your art career. Of course, this may well change over time, but as long as your vision’s clear, you can go about achieving your career goals more effectively. You stand a better chance of being successful if you offer something different from others, so have a think about what your unique selling point is. Once you’ve got a clear idea of what sets you apart from others, always bear this in mind. Be true to yourself and your unique vision. When it comes to goal setting, it’s important that you set goals you can realistically achieve. By all means, be ambitious, but don’t set your goals too high, otherwise you’ll just end up feeling frustrated and disappointed when you don’t achieve them. It’s better to achieve lots of smaller goals than not to have achieved any bigger goals.

Joanne Perkins is a Berkshire-based artist with a BA (Hons) in Fine Art. She specializes in painting Berkshire landscapes and loves capturing the natural beauty of her local countryside. She is happy to accept all queries and questions. For more information about Joanne, her work and her current projects visit:

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art styles

#ArtsyTuesday: 4 Secrets To Developing Your Own Style

art-styleBy Joanne Perkins

1. Start with what you love

You don’t just choose your style; your style is something that comes to you as you create art. The best way to go about developing your style is to start with what you love and go from there. If you’ve been creating art and you know what you love, simply go for that. If you’re not too sure, simply create lots of art and experiment in lots of different ways. Being versatile in your art is a good way of helping you realize what particular type of art you love above all others. If you create lots of different types of art, you should sooner or later come across something that you find really appealing.

2. Create lots of art

What your love is the basis for developing your style. Once you’ve got this, you can go about exploring and developing your style. Work as much as you can and create as many pieces as you can. The more you create, the more your style will develop, evolve and grow. It’s worth bearing in mind that it can take a long time for you to develop a unique style. Many artists spend years creating art in order to find their unique style – finding your style can be a long process and can therefore require a lot of your time and patience.

self_portrait_in_different_styles3. Think about what sets you apart from others

Pick an artist and look at their works to gain an idea of what their style is. What sets this artist apart from others? What’s unique about this artist’s style? Is there something common to all this artist’s pieces? Ask yourself these questions to give yourself an idea of how artists make themselves stand out. Then ask yourself these questions about your own works: what sets you apart from others? What’s unique about your style? Is there something common to your pieces?

4. Be prepared for your style to change

If you know what your style is and you’re confident it makes you stand out from the crowd, great. What you have to be prepared for is for your style to change and evolve over time. Some artists are happy to find their style and work with it for the rest of their careers. For others, sticking to one way of creating isn’t enough to satisfy their creative needs; they feel the need to always push their creativity and experiment with new styles. Even if you’re happy to stick with one style, you should be prepared for change, as changes may eventually show themselves in your works.

Joanne Perkins is a Berkshire-based artist with a BA (Hons) in Fine Art. She specializes in painting Berkshire landscapes and loves capturing the natural beauty of her local countryside. She is happy to accept all queries and questions. For more information about Joanne, her work and her current projects visit:

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your art here

#ArtsyTuesday: 4 Easy Ways To Get Your Artwork Noticed

By Joanne Perkins

1. Get on social media

It goes without saying that social media is an incredibly useful marketing tool. The vast majority of marketing experts would strongly recommend all brands have some social media presence. Get yourself on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and any others you want. There are some networks just for artists: DeviantArt, for example, is a very social and friendly online art community with 20 million members. Another good one is PaintingsIlove, a social network where you can get friendly feedback on your artwork.

2. Write a blog

Writing a blog gives you the chance to talk about whatever you want and share it with people. Of course, as an artist, you may well want to focus on your latest projects and how they’re coming along, but you also broaden your horizons and write about more general art topics. If you’ve managed to build up an audience for yourself, post content to your blog regularly and give your readers content they want to read. Find other bloggers who write a similar sort of content and offer to do a guest blog for them. They will then do a guest blog for you. The benefit you get from this is that you get to promote yourself to a different blogger’s audience.

guerrillagirls3. Get a website

Create a website for your artwork and your brand. Your website should be a welcoming place where potential customers can learn about you, your artwork and why you’ve chosen to go down this particular path. You should have lots of digital copies of your artwork on your website and people should easily be able to purchase any pieces they like the look of. Your website should also contain links to your social media accounts and your blog. Your blog and social media posts should hopefully bring people to your website, which is essentially your brand’s home, so to speak.

4. Make friends, build connections

Simply being online isn’t enough. You have to put yourself out there and establish connections. If you’re online and you don’t build up connections with others, you won’t get noticed, and neither will your artwork. Getting yourself online is the first step; the second is to interact with people. When doing this, you should be friendly, positive and genuine. Don’t bombard people with messages all about your artwork because they will be put off and won’t look at your work. Take a more subtle approach: engage in conversation, make positive comments on what others are doing and be more social. If you’re friendly and complimentary, people will be more likely to respond.

Joanne Perkins is a Berkshire-based artist with a BA (Hons) in Fine Art. She specializes in painting Berkshire landscapes and loves capturing the natural beauty of her local countryside. She is happy to accept all queries and questions. For more information about Joanne, her work and her current projects visit:

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#ArtsyTuesday: Ariana Richards – Jurassic Park Meets Botticelli

arianarichardsjurrasicparkTake a trip back in time to June of 1993 when Jurassic Park was released and the young girl eating green jello in the image above screams of terror were heard in movie theaters across the world.

She no longer caters to the big screen, she now creates beautiful landscape and figure paintings so realistic that you’d swear they were photographs.

Who knew?!

Ariana Richards is her name and she has a degree in Fine Arts and Drama and her genealogy can be traced back to the Italian Renaissance with Carlo Crivelli, a contemporary of Botticelli, so the gift is in her genes.

Ariana is an award-winning artist and her work has been featured in People Magazine, Entertainment Tonight, and Good Morning America, just to name a few!

Her website doesn’t say just how much the investment will cost, but you can request an original oil painting to be created to your specifications. I’m sure you’ll be out of a few thousand dollars in the process but it’ll be worth it.


Looks like Kirsten Dunst, doesn’t it? Click to see more of Ariana Richard’s online gallery!

Journey 7

#ArtsyTuesday: How To Competitively Price Your Art In Four Simple Steps

How-much-should-I-chargeHave you ever looked at what you consider to be a mediocre piece of art that had a price tag in the thousands and wondered – $5,000 (or whatever cost in the thousands) for that???!

Have you ever looked at a piece of art that you adored and thought the same?

Or, are you the person that looks at the price of art and doesn’t bat an eyelash when you see that the price is five or even six figures?

In fact, the higher the better as far as you’re concerned. Your wallet is open and ready!

First off, let me say I’d love for you to spend some quality time with my artwork and make a purchase but as a newbie (I’ve been painting less that ten years) I often wonder if I am charging too little or too much for my pieces.

I’m sure I’m charging too little which means I’m cheating myself but who and where are these people who buy art worth thousands? Are my pieces even worth thousands of dollars? If I am being totally honest with myself, I don’t think so. Not yet.

Cleopatra Jones

Cleopatra Jones – She’s currently priced at $100. Should I charge more? Would you pay more?

I haven’t sold a piece in years (I don’t even remember what I charged for the pieces I’ve sold in the past but I’m sure it wasn’t enough) and I really have no idea who my art buying audience is and to be quite honest I’m not that educated or informed on how things really work in the art world but I’m learning.

What I do know is that I love to create art. Or at least I used to. My muse has been on strike but she’s starting to get tired of the fight.

Creating and selling art is a legitimate business, so there comes a time when you have to take your talent, work and time seriously so that you can go from starving to thriving.

Creatives can make a living from their work.


Step 1: Define your market. Where do you sell your art? Do you sell locally, regionally, nationally or internationally? The art, artists and prices in your market are the ones you should pay the most attention to.

Step 2: Define your type of art. What kind of art do you make? What are its physical characteristics? In what ways is it similar to other art? How do you categorize it? If you paint abstracts, for example, what kind of abstracts, how would you describe them? This is the type of art that you want to generally focus on for comparison purposes.

Step 3: Determine which artists make art similar to yours either by researching online or visiting galleries, open studios or other venues and seeing their work in person. Pay particular attention to those artists who also have career accomplishments similar to yours, who’ve been making art about as long as you have, showing about as long as you have, selling about as long as you have and so on.

Step 4: See how much these similar artists charge for their art. Their prices will be good initial estimates of the prices you should charge for your art.

Learn more about pricing art by visiting

These 5 Street Art pieces are worth more than $1,000 each!
Multi Skull

Multi Skull by Seen – $1,500

I Love My Psy

I Love My Psy by Speedy Graphito – $4,000


Broken by Gregory Siff – $6,000

Journey 7

Journey #7 by Natasha June – $2,150

Liberty Head

Liberty Head by Peter Max – $6,000

What do you think? Would you shell out thousands for any of these pieces?

Leave your thoughts in the comments!


#ArtsyTuesday: How To Paint On Black Canvas

black canvas 2Over the past few years, many artists have developed a passion for painting on black canvas. The reason is because a black background can help the painter express so much more of his inner world than a plain and simple white one.

In fact, one of the very first things people learn nowadays when attending an art class is to avoid painting on a white canvas as it will not give the finished product the proper visibility it deserves and it will become boring to the viewer fairly soon.

When painting on black canvas, on the contrary, the subject of the painting itself stands out and reaches a place of its own on the canvas. When looking at paintings on black canvas, it almost feels as if the subject of the painting is about to step out and reach out to the viewer.

This is true especially if the subject is painted with bright and bold colors that make the painting seem alive and real on the deep contrast that the black background provides. They express happiness, joy and love for life.

On the other hand, by using different shades of black, white and grey, the painting can suggest moody, mysterious, gothic, shady, and scary scenarios.

The deep dark background of the black canvas can help artists express their anxiety, frustration, dissatisfaction and unhappiness.

Ways to properly paint on a black canvas

StLaurent_2_54x65__original_largeThe technique that an artist needs to use to properly paint of a black canvas can be slightly different from the one he uses when painting on a white one.

First of all, the black canvas is usually not framed, which makes it difficult for the painter to come up with a solution as to how to cover the painting’s sides in order not to leave them blank.

Some artists opt for a unified painting, meaning they continue the painting on the side as well, giving it a multiple-dimension look. Other painters instead choose the old-fashioned way of covering the sides with duct tape before they start painting.

blackcanvaartWhen approaching painting on a black canvas, it is suggested to begin by drawing a sketch of the subject by using a light grey pencil and then cover it with white paint.

In order to give the painting dimension and depth, it is important to use darker colors in contrast with lighter ones that will help create the impression that the painting itself is about to come out of the canvas.

It is recommended using either shades of white or yellow ochre as beginning colors when painting on a black canvas. Even if the yellow will seem to give too much of a contrast from the black background, this impression will quickly change as the other colors follow to create the subject that is intended to be portrayed.

When painting on black canvas it is preferred not to use watercolors and oils as they give the impression of wavy and weak images. On the contrary, acrylics create a much firmer and assertive impression when adapted to black canvas paintings.

This was a guest post left by Aronno755, a writer and art lover.

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