I AM African-American (and so are you)

I AM African-American

(and so are you)

YOU = Black people living in America.

African-American

Assimilation

  • the process of adapting or adjusting to the culture of a group or nation, or the state of being so adapted: assimilation of immigrants into American life.
  • Sociology. the merging of cultural traits from previously distinct cultural groups, not involving biological amalgamation.

I turn my nose up at any Black person living in America that has a problem with being called African-American.

They say things like: I’m not African! I wasn’t born in Africa!

As if being born in America (or wherever else your Black ass was born) means that you have no ties to Africa or your heritage.


STOP AFRICA SHAMMING

Like many Black people living in America, I had absolutely no idea where my African ancestors came from or what other ethnicities I was “mixed” with.

I just knew I was Black, so a few years ago I happily made the $100 investment to get an Ancestry DNA test kit.

I learned that I am 83% African, 16% European, and 1% West Asian.

My African ancestry includes ties to Cameroon/Congo, Benin/Togo, and Ivory Coast/Ghana.

African-American

Here’s another silly argument: Charlize Theron was born in Africa but she lives in America now, so that makes her African-American too!

I see what they’re trying to do there but it’s clear (at least to me) that it is NOT the same thing.

Charlize is not Black. According to Wikipedia, she has French, German, and Dutch ancestry. Her French ancestors settled in South Africa.


European South African-American?

Charlize currently has both South African and American citizenship, so in my mind, when she lives in Africa, it would make sense that she be considered a White-South African or Caucasian-South African and when she’s on American soil she’s just plain ol’ Caucasian. A White or European-American.

You know, after typing the above paragraph then reading it back, I may sound absolutely ridiculous but hopefully you get my point anyway.

Charlize is not of African descent. She was just born there! That, my friends, is the difference.

For example, if I obtained French citizenship or if I was born in France I would probably be considered Afro-French, which I am not a fan of BTW; that Afro shit in regards to race or ethnicity is outdated (IMO).

African-French, Black-French or even the sophisticated sounding, African-European, works just fine for me.


GOOGLE IT!

After typing “What are White people born in Africa called?” into Google, the first thing that pops up is the Ask the White Guy column on DiversityInc.

Here’s part of his breakdown on the subject:

“African-American” refers to descendants of enslaved Black people who are from the United States.

The reason we use an entire continent (Africa) instead of a country (e.g., “Italian-American”) is because slave masters purposefully obliterated tribal ancestry, language and family units in order to destroy the spirit of the people they enslaved, thereby making it impossible for their descendants to trace their history prior to being born into slavery.

This was all in an effort to prevent enslaved people from organizing and revolting their bondage (look up Nat Turner).

Ahhh…so, I guess it would make even more sense to say that Charlize Theron is Benoni-American because she was born in Benoni.

Does that mean that I should/can identify as Cameroon-American because that makes up the largest percentage of my African heritage?

I SAY YES!

African-American

Charlize Theron


 RACIAL STIGMA!

Racial stigma in this case involves how people perceive Africa. The continent of Africa suffers from many negative stigmas including but not limited to: apartheid, poverty, conflict, Ebola, and HIV.

Because of this, some people do not want to be associated with Africa in any way, shape, or form.

As if America is so damn great AND VALUES the lives of BLACK PEOPLE…

The are also (of course) many beautiful things about Africa. ↵ READ!!!


Just remember, when you walk around boasting that you aren’t African-American (but that you are Black) that you aren’t doing yourself any favors; you sound like a self-hating fool.

Any self-respecting or prideful Black person knows that turning your back on Africa is the same as turning your back on your people and yourself.

 

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I Am The 14% – Black People in America: Why We Will Never Overcome

overcome

Sadly, we won’t.

I Am The 14% – Black People in America: Why We Will Never Overcome

Remember the following fact the next time a Black woman or man is unjustly killed or why it is so hard for us to overcome the effects of racism in this country. Also factor in that many of us only want to assimilate.

We are a minority in more ways than one.

In 2012 US Census Bureau estimated 44,456,009 African Americans in the United States meaning that 14.1% of the total American population of 313.9 Million is Black. This includes those who identify as ‘Black Only’ and as ‘Black in combination with another race’. The ‘Black Only’ category totaled 41.2 million African Americans or 13.1% of the total U.S population.

via BlackDemographics.com | The African American Population.

 

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I’m 83% African, 16% European and 1% West Asian

Thanks to Ancestry DNA I now know my full ethnic background. It’s very fascinating, humbling and empowering to learn where my ancestors come from.

I can’t wait to further explore all the places that make me who I am by conducting research, trying local recipes, meeting new family members and hopefully one day visiting each place in person.

I was surprised to find that I have no Native American heritage since like many other African Americans, I have been told that we have “Indian” in our family.

However, learning exactly where I come from in Africa combined with my European and West Asian ancestry; I could not be more happy and proud.

Take a little peek into the places that make up the majority of my ethnicity below:

ancestry dna

Cameroon/Congo

Primarily located in: Cameroon, Gabon, Congo, Republic of Congo

Also found in: Angola, Chad

Because they lie near or on the equator, these nations typically include tropical rainforest and humid savanna. While the Congo takes its name from the old African kingdom of Kongo, Cameroon gets its name from the first Europeans to arrive in the area in 1472. Portuguese sailors found crayfish in the Wouri River and started calling the land the Rio dos Camarões, or River of Shrimp. Eventually, the word Camarões became Cameroon.

ancestry dna

Europe West

Primarily located in: Belgium, France, Germany, Netherlands, Switzerland, Luxembourg, Liechtenstein

Also found in: England, Denmark, Italy, Slovenia, Czech Republic

The Europe West region is a broad expanse stretching from Amsterdam’s sea-level metropolis to the majestic peaks of the Alps. Geographically dominated by France in the west and Germany in the east, it includes several nations with distinct cultural identities. From the boisterous beer gardens of Munich to the sun-soaked vineyards of Bordeaux and the alpine dairy farms of Switzerland, it is a region of charming cultural diversity.

ancestry dna

Caucasus

Primarily located in: Armenia, Azerbaijan, Georgia, Iran, Iraq, Syria, Turkey

Also found in: Bulgaria, Jordan, Greece, Italy, Kuwait, Palestine, Romania, Turkmenistan

The Greater Caucasus Range, running northwest to southeast between the Black and Caspian Seas, is the traditional line of demarcation between the continents of Europe and Asia. It was here, according to Greek mythology, that Zeus bound Prometheus for giving fire to humans. Linguistically, culturally, and even ecologically diverse, the Caucasus area is home to more than 50 ethnic groups and is one of 34 “biodiversity hotspots” (areas with significant, threatened biodiversity) in the world.


Check out this scene from the film, Congo. It tickles me.

Enjoy!